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Posted to Landscape about 1177 days ago, 0 comment(s)
I've been so busy I haven't been able to do much on here... so thought I would at least make one post such as it is!!!
Posted to Landscape about 1177 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Please stop by my website at ©Kerry Brown Photography
Posted to Landscape about 1178 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Please visit my website at ©Kerry Brown Photography
Posted to Historical Sites about 1178 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Be sure to stop by my website at©Kerry Brown Photography
Posted to Historical Sites about 1178 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Just happened to be chatting online with a few members of this group at 2am this morning, and I suddenly had this rash urge to set my alarm for 'stupid o'clock'

So just a little over two hours later, found me ankle deep in the freezing cold North Sea (and yes my boots leak), but results like this make the sacrifices all worth it
:-)

The camera has been gathering dust for far too long, I'm heading back to photoland
Posted to Sand and Sea about 1178 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Nature about 1179 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Architecture about 1179 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Friday morning, 25th March 2016
Posted to Landscape about 1179 days ago, 0 comment(s)
College Fjord is a fjord located in the northern sector of Prince William Sound in the U.S. state of Alaska. The fjord contains five tidewater glaciers (glaciers that terminate in water), five large valley glaciers, and dozens of smaller glaciers, most named after renowned East Coast colleges (women's colleges for the NW side, and men's colleges for the SE side). College Fjord was discovered in 1899 during the Harriman Expedition, at which time the glaciers were named. The expedition included a Harvard and an Amherst professor, and they named many of the glaciers after elite colleges. According to Bruce Molina, author of Alaska's Glaciers, "They took great delight in ignoring Princeton."
Posted to Landscape about 1180 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Sir William Hillary moved to the Isle of Man in 1808 and began to know the dangerous waters of the Irish Sea which surrounded Douglas Bay. In around 1824 he conceived the concept of a life boat service manned by a trained crew. The idea was new, but soon prompted the creation of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

It was not till Hillary took part in a rescue for a Steam Packet vessel and was washed overboard that he realised the coast was too far to swim to, yet a place was needed for sailors to wait for rescue. Soon after an idea Sir William Hillary had became a reality. Designed by John Welch the Tower of Refuge, as it came to be called, was completed in 1832. Situated upon Conister Rock in Douglas Bay a granite haven in the form of a small castle took its place as a lifesaver for sailors. Built at a cost of which almost half was paid by Hillary himself and the other by subscription. The tower was kept well stocked with fresh water and bread, ready to offered shelter from the weather and sea.
Posted to Sand and Sea about 1182 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Experimental and Abstract about 1182 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Landscape about 1184 days ago, 1 comment(s)