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Slightly different edit of mid-summer afternoon sun peaking between Rocky Mountain peaks and heavy, nondescript overcast to illuminate the Larimer Square Clock Tower along Downtown Denver's 16th Street Mall.
Posted to Architecture about 834 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Taken while leaving Colorado Convention Center along Downtown Denver's 16th Street Mall. Heavy overcast and low afternoon sun created interesting light on Larimer Square Clock Tower and adjacent skyscrapers.
Posted to Architecture about 834 days ago, 0 comment(s)
March 9th, 8:30pm
Posted to Long Exposure about 897 days ago, 2 comment(s)
American flag flies proudly atop Larimer Square Clock Tower in the middle of Denver, CO, 16th Street Mall jut before July 4th.
Posted to Urban about 1146 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Landscape about 1175 days ago, 0 comment(s)
(image)
Posted to Lighthouses about 1221 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Floral and Fauna about 1230 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Sir William Hillary moved to the Isle of Man in 1808 and began to know the dangerous waters of the Irish Sea which surrounded Douglas Bay. In around 1824 he conceived the concept of a life boat service manned by a trained crew. The idea was new, but soon prompted the creation of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

It was not till Hillary took part in a rescue for a Steam Packet vessel and was washed overboard that he realised the coast was too far to swim to, yet a place was needed for sailors to wait for rescue. Soon after an idea Sir William Hillary had became a reality. Designed by John Welch the Tower of Refuge, as it came to be called, was completed in 1832. Situated upon Conister Rock in Douglas Bay a granite haven in the form of a small castle took its place as a lifesaver for sailors. Built at a cost of which almost half was paid by Hillary himself and the other by subscription. The tower was kept well stocked with fresh water and bread, ready to offered shelter from the weather and sea.
Posted to Sand and Sea about 1250 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Detroit Michigan US, Magnificent towers.
Posted to Architecture about 1267 days ago, 1 comment(s)
(image)
Posted to Black and White about 1309 days ago, 0 comment(s)
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Posted to Black and White about 1334 days ago, 0 comment(s)
(image)
Posted to Black and White about 1334 days ago, 0 comment(s)
An old time water tower in a nearby town. I took this a while back and never did anything with it but decided to now.
Posted to Architecture about 1336 days ago, 0 comment(s)
I took this photo a while back while competing in a 5-day black and white challenge.
Posted to Black and White about 1348 days ago, 1 comment(s)
(image)
Posted to Architecture about 1360 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Architecture about 1361 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Small bells cap the clock tower in front of Royal Plaza open air mall, Oranjestad, Aruba. Strange because time is not important on tropical islands, at least so go the cliches.
Posted to Street Photography about 1366 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Black and White about 1386 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Long Exposure about 1394 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Long Exposure about 1394 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Long Exposure about 1395 days ago, 0 comment(s)
The Carillion Tower on the newly renamed state park of Belle Isle which is located in the middle of the Detroit River. Very clean, family and pet friendly, perfect for watching boats and freighters make their way up and down the river. There's picnic areas and also a public beach with The Detroit Yacht Club close by.
Posted to Architecture about 1412 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Tower over all,
we see
those leaves light upon the ground,
trod upon, no second thought
because the people like the sound
Posted to Autumn about 1419 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Landscape about 1425 days ago, 0 comment(s)
HILLARY, Sir WILLIAM (1771–1847), founder of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, born in 1771 of an old Wensleydale family.
Upon the renewal of the war with France in 1803, he raised at his own expense, and many years commanded, the First Essex Legion of infantry and cavalry, amounting to 1,400 men, the largest force then offered by any private individual for the defence of his country. Following the war Sir William left Essex and settled at Fort Anne, near Douglas, in the Isle of Man. The large number of wrecks that he witnessed, culminating in 1822, when the government cutter Vigilance, the naval brig Racehorse, and many smaller vessels were destroyed off the Isle of Man, directed his attention to the question of saving life at sea. In February 1823 he issued 'An Appeal to the British Nation on the Humanity and Policy of forming a National Institution for the Preservation of Lives and Property from Shipwreck,' which he dedicated to George IV. The Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck (since 1853 the Royal National Lifeboat Institution) was founded and established upon a permanent basis, with the Earl of Liverpool as first president.
Returning to the Isle of Man, Hillary established in 1826 a district association, of which he became president, and provided the four chief harbours of the island not only with lifeboats but also with the apparatus of Manby and Trengrouse.
Hillary frequently went out in the boats himself, and was instrumental in saving many lives. In December 1827, assisted by his son. he aided in saving seventeen men from the Swedish barque Fortroindet, and in the same year, at the expense of six ribs fractured, he took a prominent part in the saving of the crew of the St. George. On 29 Nov. 1830 he set out with a crew of fourteen volunteers and saved sixty-two persons (though he nearly lost his own life by being washed overboard), and gained the Shipwreck Institution's gold medal. In 1832 he planned the picturesque tower of refuge on St. Mary's, or Conister rock, in Douglas Bay. He established a sailors' home at Douglas, and was a strong advocate of the government building a breakwater and making a harbour of refuge in Douglas Bay. His last public act was to preside at a meeting held at Douglas to memorialise the government on this subject in March 1845, when he had to be carried from his residence at Fort Anne to the court house in a chair. Enfeebled in body, but full of mental vigour and public spirit to the last, he died at Woodville, near Douglas, on 5 Jan. 1847, and was buried in Douglas churchyard, 'followed to the grave by crowds who had witnessed his heroism and self-devotion in saving the life of the shipwrecked mariner.'
Posted to Sand and Sea about 1447 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Where I live.
Posted to Sand and Sea about 1451 days ago, 1 comment(s)
Posted to Long Exposure about 1453 days ago, 2 comment(s)
If you can see it, they can see you! The watch tower at Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia.
Posted to Black and White about 1480 days ago, 0 comment(s)
To compare with the day view...
Posted to Architecture about 1487 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Just after sun shines on the towers.
Posted to Architecture about 1487 days ago, 0 comment(s)
From the Viewing Deck
Posted to Architecture about 1487 days ago, 0 comment(s)
The Needle in Daylight.
Posted to Architecture about 1487 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Seen between the office towers, it seems we have aliens!
Posted to Architecture about 1487 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Floral and Fauna about 1499 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to National Parks and Forests about 1499 days ago, 0 comment(s)
I pass but his water tower a lot and have thought that it was a cool image waiting to be snapped. This particular shot Iused the Apple camera and then edited in Snapseed. I really like how th image turned using an HDR filter.
Posted to HDR about 1530 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Posted to Urban about 1536 days ago, 0 comment(s)
Processed with HDR Efex Pro, to give a gritty, futuristic, industrial style

Canon EOS 20D
Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
1/200s f/8.0 at 44.0mm
iso200

CC Welcome
Posted to HDR about 1544 days ago, 4 comment(s)